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of the state of michigan. she led the fight working with senator roberts. and they worked together not just on the substance but worked together in a manner that allowed it to be bipartisan. i've made it a priority in my work representing the people of pennsylvania to keep pennsylvania's agricultural industry and our rural economy strong to support families in pennsylvania. agriculture is our state's largest industry. pennsylvania's farm gain value -- which is another way of describing cash receipts to growers -- and the last number that we have, which is a 2010 number, was $5.7 billion. a lot of people who probably haven't spent much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm b
at what is happening in michigan, thousands of union supporters turned out on the steps of the capitol to protest right to work measures. the measure passed. taking a look at the front page of "the detroit free press," "the law that is not over." "unions will not go down without a fight. recall efforts and legal challenges are possible." there you can see a union representative struggling with michigan state police yesterday over right to work legislation. here is the story -- host: "the washington post" has a map of right to work law states. "the wall street journal" take a look -- takes a look at which states are the most union heavy. the biggest ones are new york, alaska, hawaii, and washington. michigan comes right in behind washington. which is why "the wall street journal" goes with the headline that this is a blow in a particularly union dominated state. looking at some other news, this one out of the south, for "the new york times," "the gop control in north carolina, with a republican controlled legislature, long a politically moderate player will soon have its most conservati
: i thank the gentleman, i yield a minute and a half to the gentleman from michigan. mr. curson: my grandson stood here with me when i took my oath of office one of the proudest moments of my life. just moments before this horrible act took place, michigan's lame duck legislators allowed persons to bring concealed firearms into schools, college dorms, churches, hospitals, bars and sports stadiums. firearms have absolutely no place in our schools. the tragic massacre at sandy hook is a chilling and heartbreaking reminder of this. last week, innocent children, babies, went to school to a safe place where they loved to be. six public servants went to school to the children they loved almost as much as their own. those six died trying to save those precious gifts. 20 of those babies were savagely murdered. we witnessed this who are endous murders before at virginia tech, 16 murdered at the university of texas as austin, 13 students and faculty murdered at columbine. i support reasonable gun ownership. senate bill 59 is now sitting on governor snyder's desk. in the spirit of this resolut
political activity. and i must confess, i took a look at it. when i got into the hospital in michigan, one of the fellows that i met there was bob dole. and we became good friends, even to this day. and i asked him, what are your plans? nt, without hesitating, he said that i'm going to be a county clerk and after that i will run for the state house. that is where i'm going. and i figure that is a good idea. [laughter] i go to law school, i become the assistant prosecutor. when the territorial office became available, i ran for that office. and then i got to congress. a little ahead of bob. [laughter] >> you are in the territorial legislature then? >> two terms in the house and part of the chair of the senate. >> and then you came here to the house. who did you come here with a time? >> only one member. >> you mentioned senator dole. the fact that you had been in the hospital with him in michigan. it is amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service, it is talked about being a friend of, excuse me, the senator from wyoming, al simpson. meeting him when he
, michigan, a republican caller. go ahead, frank. caller: yes. look, first of all, we need to find out like exactly who is mentally ill and who's not mentally ill and the rimets need to be like finish if someone lives in a house who is mentally ill, obviously, we cannot have weapons of any kind within their range. that's what the law should be. the law shouldn't be we shouldn't just outlaw all weapons we should just outlaw anyone who is obviously with mental issues. the guy who in virginia tech, he had a depression issue. he went to a doctor and still somehow got his hands on two .9 millimeter weapons and you can't tell me that the guy in colorado didn't have mental issue. you can just look at the guy and know that there's something wrong there. we just with to keep the weapons like out of the household or how far range for these people who have mental health. host: frank, the questions that you pose, who are the mentally ill, we will ask those types of questions tomorrow on "washington journal." we're going to have a roundtable discussion with a republican and a democrat who co chair the m
pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from michigan, mr. curson, for five minutes. mr. curson: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for five minutes. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. curson: thank you. my thanks to the chair. today i rise to recognize mrs. carolyn coleman, executive secretary to the secretary treasurer of the international union u.a.w., on her retirement. as a member of congress, it is both my privilege and honor to recognize mrs. coleman for her many years of service and her contributions which have enriched and strengthened our communities. mrs. coleman brings a lifetime of experience to her current position to the united auto workers, a career which began in july of 1967 in the u.a.w.'s women's department. carolyn's skill and knowledge led her to be selected to premiere assignments. she directly assisted many great union leaders in their important work. including u.a.w. vice president's dick shoemaker, and carl raveson, as well as u.a.w. president owen bieber, and treasurer dennis rayh
. president obama stopped in michigan. he will be talking about the economy and extending tax cuts. >> and again, of course live coverage of the senate later today. they will become at 2:00. we will hear from president obama will be making a stop in michigan. he's going to talk about the economy and extended tax cuts. he's been working on a deal with john boehner. they met yesterday to discuss the fiscal cliff. the president will visit a diameter eco-plant in redford. and as "the detroit news" reports, the company plans to announce $109 investment in that plan for new technology and expanding their production. you can watch the president's remarks live at about 2:00 eastern over on our companion network, c-span. >> friday, former reagan officials reflected on the 1987 negotiations on a nuclear missile treaty with the soviet union. the intermediate nuclear forces treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, ja
to express the fact that last night i came in to do a special order on the situation happening in michigan where a surprise attack, a sneak attack by the right wingers resulted in the passage of legislation, which i won't refer to as right to work legislation, it's more appropriately named crush the union legislation. i came up last night to the floor to speak on that issue, and as i am prone to do, i use a lot of analogies. so last night i used an analogy that some find offensive, and i certainly was not meaning to be offensive or use a derogatory term. you know, everybody knows what the n word is. . the n word, mr. speaker, is used to describe a group of people and the n word used to be fashionable or it used to be socially acceptable to use the n word, but now we don't say the n word, we say -- we refer to that word as the n word. i had never heard of the m word, representative schakowsky, the m word. it's a word also that describes a group of people and it at one time has been commonly used as a desipive -- descripive term. it was at one time socially -- scripive term. it was at one ti
. president obama getting into a stare down with michigan governor. rick snyder said the president looked him in the eye and said he was not please about it. but snyder said thank you for sharing that to me. workers michigan became the 24th state to adopt the right to work measure. puppy to trained rescue. teaching young animals how to find avalanche victim. the nose can find them even if we don't see them. >> they can pick up on a scent of someone and arcticle . alert on it . then we would assist them in dicking. >> julia: it takes three years of training before the dog can test . join the special patrol. all right. those are the headlines. more later. >> clayton: now all of the extreme weather alert. another day of snowy weather in the northeast. so far six people were killed in the christmas storm system that spawned blizzard and sleet and rare winter tornados. we'll go to maria molina who is tracking the latest on this. >> good tow see you. another storm we are talking about as we head in tomorrow and this weekend. right on the feels of this storm system. it is getting it is producing sno
limit. we have to recognize many of the second homes are in places like michigan, wisconsin, arkansas, where people are looking for a weekend fishing lodge. very not the hamptons or expensive homes in beverly hills. many homes are scattered in the midwest. host: our first call for lawrence yun comes from dan in virginia beach, virginia. caller: i'm interested in this topic, especially being under water. but not terribly under water. some time ago, the president suggested that all the banks or lenders should forgive the difference between where the market is and what they borrowed. bankught, there's not one on earth that will do that. here's an idea. i pay $135 a month in my payment for private mortgage insurance. since i have had this home loan, it's over $6,000 that has gone through this private mortgage insurance. i thought, if the president wants to do that will lower my payment or increase my payment and that would be a better way to move the housing market forward. i am interested in any comment on that matter. guest: the first think most people would agree on is that market inte
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10